Tea and the arts of Japan.
Read Online
Share

Tea and the arts of Japan.

  • 348 Want to read
  • ·
  • 69 Currently reading

Published in Kyoto .
Written in

Subjects:

  • Tea.

Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination80 p. :
Number of Pages80
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21443217M

Download Tea and the arts of Japan.

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Published in , Okakura’s ‘Book of Tea’ espouses that tea is the foundation for a system of life, a philosophy, and it’s associated benefits all conspire to bring together that which is fundamental, holistically and spiritually.4/4(). The Japanese phrase Chanoyu, translated literally as “hot water for tea,” refers to the tradition of preparing and serving powdered green tea in a highly stylized art of Chanoyu, also called “tea gathering” by practitioners, combines elements encompassing fine and applied arts, architecture, landscape design, and etiquette.   This elegant book explores the aesthetics and history of the traditional Japanese tea ceremony, examining the nature of tea collections and the links between connoisseurship, politics, and international relations. It also surveys current practices and settings in light of the ongoing transformation of the tradition in contemporary tea houses. The Book of Tea by Okakura Kakuzō Too little tea, we learn, was a Japanese expression used in reference to a person too busy to stop and smell the roses. Too much tea, then, refers to a person so busy smelling the roses he has little time for much else. In my humble estimation, Mr. Okakura had a little too much tea in him/5.

The Book of Tea (茶の本, Cha no Hon) by Okakura Kakuzō () is a long essay linking the role of chadō (teaism) to the aesthetic and cultural aspects of Japanese life. The Japanese approach to Tea and the Tea Ceremony itself has always fascinated Westerners and although there are several key historic works on the subject (including the celebrated Book of Tea and more recently, Chado: The Way of Tea) this is the first study to look at how the culture and politics of Tea in Japan actually began with Rikyu, the famous sixteenth-century master of tea. Japanese tea ceremony (known as sadō/chadō (茶道, lit., "The Way of Tea") or cha-no-yu (茶の湯)) is a Japanese cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of matcha (抹茶), powdered green tea, the art of which is called (o)temae ([お]手前; [お]点前).. Zen Buddhism was a primary influence in the development of the Japanese tea ceremony. As the author of such works as The Ideals of the East (), The Awakening of Japan (), and The Book of Tea (), he reached an even wider audience eager to find an antidote to the clanging steel and belching smokestacks of Western modernity.

Japanese tea ceremony (known as sadō/chadō (茶道, lit., "The Way of Tea") or cha-no-yu (茶の湯)) is a Japanese cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of matcha (抹茶), powdered green tea, the art of which is called (o)temae ([お]手前; [お]点前). Chanoyu Quarterly: Tea and the Arts of Japan No. 45 Paperback – January 1, by Chanoyu Quarterly (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback, January 1, "Please retry" — — $ Paperback from $ Author: Chanoyu Quarterly. Okakura Kakuzō (岡倉 覚三, Febru – September 2, ) (also known as 岡倉 天心 Okakura Tenshin) was a Japanese scholar who contributed to the development of arts in Japan. Outside Japan, he is chiefly remembered today as the author of The Book of Tea.   The Japanese Tea Ceremony is a detailed examination of the five-centuries-old tea ceremony—or Cha-no-Yu in Japanese, literally "hot water for tea"—a cornerstone of Japanese culture and a core practice of Zen Buddhism. Framed by intricately choreographed steps, the tea ceremony is as much about the search for enlightenment as it is about serving tea/5(21).